Sunday, February 18, 2007

Vive L'Amour

This is a scene from Tsai Ming-Liang's Vive L'Amour... a crying scene like no other...



A memorable description from Dennis Lim in Village Voice.

In a scene saturated with the perversely lucid regret of a bleary morning-after, she walks through a desolate park at daybreak, seats herself at a bench, and starts to cry—an implacable tidal wave with a life of its own, going beyond surrender, beyond absurdity, beyond catharsis, right into the realm of fables. The fade to black arrives just as you've convinced yourself she could go on weeping forever.

14 comments:

Space Bar said...

yes, gosh! i remember this! i especially loved the - sorry - good the drips down and she makes no move to lick or wipe it off.

thanks!

and have you see i don't want to sleep alone yet? not managed to lay hands on it here...

Space Bar said...

er...that's 'goo'

Alok said...

Nope haven't seen it yet. Haven't seen Wayward Cloud yet too. Only two films of his that are left.

Wayward Cloud is supposed to play somewhere here next month. May be I will check it out. I have avoided it so far after reading about its subject matter.

Vidya said...

>>The fade to black arrives just as you've convinced yourself she could go on weeping forever.


Exactly.The last few frames were beautiful.

Space Bar said...

no, no...don't avoid it! since you've seen what time is it there and the skywalk is gone (have you?) wayward cloud will make perfect sense. and really, subject matter cannot be written about in reviews without making it sound like either high comedy or low farce. ming-liang is much more than that.

Alok said...

yes I have seen skywalk is gone. It was an 'extra' in the Goodbye Dragon Inn DVD.

I had read about wayward cloud somewhere but then forgotten about it. It starts only next weekend and will play for two weeks. Will try to be there. lets see...

jyothsnay said...

Emily said
Speech—is a prank of Parliament—
Tears—is a trick of the nerve—
But the Heart with the heaviest freight on—
Doesn't—always—move
I would say...
transfixed with many a throe, grief bows its sorrowing head, like a painter of hues unfading; to blend upon the pallet-her face

Alok said...

great lines! thanks!

antonia said...

it has a reason why I don't go too often watching movies

Alok said...

Hmmm. but you read books which are far more depressing and sadder than these scenes. at least the girl is crying her heart out. she will feel better after she is done.

antonia said...

you're right. but who doesn't say one cannot cry because of a book :) I actually like life. I am a cynical optimist. Maybe not at the moment, but in general.

Alok said...

Yes but with books it is not immediate. at least for me. the immediate effect is the mind struggling with the language and meaning and all the complexities and vagueness. may be i read books which are too complex for me at this stage.

reading musil these days is making me depressed but in a very vague way.

Antonia said...

now that I think of it, when I remember reading it, i felt that too, this vague depressiveness. Despite all the nice moments in this book.

I dont cry often over books, but when it happens it comesout of the blue somehow, independent of thinking about language or so, the story somehow unconsciously ´prepared´ it.

Alok said...

yes it happens with me too. some kind of a delayed emotional reaction and even then the cause remains somewhat vague and hidden.